Myrtle Beach Air Force Base

Myrtle Beach Air Force Base is a closed United States Air Force facility, located in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. It was established in 1940 as a World War II training base and was also used for coastal patrols during the war. After the war it was a front-line USAF base in the Cold War, Vietnam War, and the Persian Gulf War of 1990.

The base was closed in 1993 and is currently being redeveloped for civilian uses.

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Myrtle Beach Air Force Base - History - Major Units Assigned
... Mississippi) 323d Bombardment Group (Training), November 4, 1942 – April 25, 1943 519th Base HQ and Air Base Sq, March 30, 1943 391st Bombardment Group (Training), May 24 ...

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