Mutual Improvement Association

Some articles on improvement, association, mutual improvement association:

Cooperative Funds Act - Federal Acts
... services in connection with the survey, construction, maintenance, or improvement of highways on behalf of other government agencies ... work in forest investigations or protection, management, and improvement of the National Forest System ... benefit of the depositor, for administration, protection, improvement, reforestation, and such other kinds of work as the Forest Service is authorized to do on lands of the United States (a) on state, county ...
Young Women (organization) - History
... The first official youth association of the church—the Young Gentlemen’s and Young Ladies’ Relief Society—was formally organized by Nauvoo youth on the advice of church founder Joseph Smith in ... Ladies' Department of the Cooperative Retrenchment Association ... We are about to organize a retrenchment Association, which I want you all to join, and I want you to vote to retrench in.. ...
Young Women (organization) - In The Church Today - Local Organization - Mia Maid
... the church's program for young women, which was the Young Women's Mutual Improvement Association, or YWMIA ... The purpose statement of the Mia Maids is "The term Mia refers to the Mutual Improvement Association (MIA), which was once the name of the youth program in the Church ... The Mutual Improvement Association adopted the rose as an emblem of their organization, and that emblem continues with Mia Maids today as a symbol of love, faith, and purity ...

Famous quotes containing the words association, mutual and/or improvement:

    The spiritual kinship between Lincoln and Whitman was founded upon their Americanism, their essential Westernism. Whitman had grown up without much formal education; Lincoln had scarcely any education. One had become the notable poet of the day; one the orator of the Gettsyburg Address. It was inevitable that Whitman as a poet should turn with a feeling of kinship to Lincoln, and even without any association or contact feel that Lincoln was his.
    Edgar Lee Masters (1869–1950)

    Nature’s law says that the strong must prevent the weak from living, but only in a newspaper article or textbook can this be packaged into a comprehensible thought. In the soup of everyday life, in the mixture of minutia from which human relations are woven, it is not a law. It is a logical incongruity when both strong and weak fall victim to their mutual relations, unconsciously subservient to some unknown guiding power that stands outside of life, irrelevant to man.
    Anton Pavlovich Chekhov (1860–1904)

    The American people owe it to themselves, and to the cause of free Government, to prove by their establishments for the advancement and diffusion of knowledge, that their political Institutions ... are as favorable to the intellectual and moral improvement of Man as they are conformable to his individual and social rights.
    James Madison (1751–1836)