Music of Japan

The music of Japan includes a wide array of performers in distinct styles both traditional and modern. The word for music in Japanese is 音楽 (ongaku), combining the kanji 音 ("on" sound) with the kanji 楽 ("gaku" music). Japan is the largest music market in the world, with a total retail value of 4,096.7 million dollars and most of the market is dominated by Japanese artists.

Local music often appears at karaoke venues, which is on lease from the record labels. Traditional Japanese music is quite different from Western Music and is based on the intervals of human breathing rather than mathematical timing. In 1873, a British traveler claimed that Japanese music, "exasperate beyond all endurance the European breast."

Read more about Music Of JapanTraditional and Folk Music

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Music Of Japan - Popular Music - Game Music
... See also Video game music, Chiptune, and Bitpop When the first electronic games were sold, they only had rudimentary sound chips with which to produce music ... As the technology advanced, the quality of sound and music these game machines could produce increased dramatically ... The first game to take credit for its music was Xevious, also noteworthy for its deeply (at that time) constructed stories ...

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