Mother Goose - Mother Goose As Nursery Rhymes

Mother Goose As Nursery Rhymes

John Newbery published a compilation of English rhymes, Mother Goose's Melody, or, Sonnets for the Cradl 1791 edition of Mother Goose's Melody which switched the focus from fairy tales to nursery rhymes, and in English this was until recently the primary connotation for Mother Goose.

A book of poems for children entitled Mother Goose's Melody was published in England in 1781, and the name "Mother Goose" has been associated with children's poetry ever since.

In 1837, John Bellenden Ker Gawler published a book (with a 2nd-volume sequel in 1840) deriving the origin of the Mother Goose rhymes from Flemish ('Low Dutch') puns.

In music, Maurice Ravel wrote Ma mère l'oye, a suite for the piano, which he then orchestrated for a ballet. There is also a song called "Mother Goose" by progressive rock band Jethro Tull from their 1971 Aqualung album. The song seems to be unrelated to the figure of Mother Goose since she is only the first of many surreal images that the narrator encounters and describes through the lyrics.

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Famous quotes containing the words nursery rhymes, rhymes, nursery, mother and/or goose:

    Yes, I know.
    Death sits with his key in my lock.
    Not one day is taken for granted.
    Even nursery rhymes have put me in hock.
    Anne Sexton (1928–1974)

    Always polite, fastidiously dressed in a linen duster and mask, he used to leave behind facetious rhymes signed “Black Bart, Po—8,” in mail and express boxes after he had finished rifling them.
    —For the State of California, U.S. public relief program (1935-1943)

    The very nursery tales of this generation were the nursery tales of primeval races. They migrate from east to west, and again from west to east; now expanded into the “tale divine” of bards, now shrunk into a popular rhyme.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    Indifference is commonly the mother of discretion.
    Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl Chesterfield (1694–1773)

    There was a crooked man, and he went a crooked mile,
    He found a crooked sixpence against a crooked stile:
    He bought a crooked cat which caught a crooked mouse,
    And they all lived together in a little crooked house.
    —Mother Goose (fl. 17th–18th century. There was a crooked man, and he went a crooked mile (l. 1–4)