Mot - Science and Technology

Science and Technology

  • A measure of sperm motility
  • Magneto-optical trap, in physics
  • Molecular Orbital Theory, in chemistry
  • Multimedia Object Transfer Protocol, ETSI-Standard EN 301 234
  • Multiple Object Tracking, method for studying visual attention
  • Management of Technology
  • Microwave Oven Transformer

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Other articles related to "science, science and, science and technology, technology":

J. Robert Oppenheimer - Final Years
... what would eventually become the World Academy of Art and Science in 1960 ... invited, did he attend the first Pugwash Conferences on Science and World Affairs in 1957 ... the difficulty of managing the power of knowledge in a world in which the freedom of science to exchange ideas was more and more hobbled by political concerns ...
Science and Society - Political Usage
... See also Politicization of science Many issues damage the relationship of science to the media and the use of science and scientific arguments by politicians ... or think tank makes it their only goal to cast doubt on supported science because it conflicts with political agendas ...
List Of University Of California, Los Angeles People - Notable Alumni - Academia, Science and Technology
... in library and information science Charles Elachi, M.S. 1955 – physicist former president, California Institute of Technology Anna Lee Fisher, B.S ... to the Food and Drug Administration, National Science Foundation, the National Research Foundation, and the Ford Foundation David Ho – physician and AIDS researcher 1996 Time Person ...

Famous quotes containing the words science and, technology and/or science:

    Romance should never begin with sentiment. It should begin with science and end with a settlement.
    Oscar Wilde (1854–1900)

    The real accomplishment of modern science and technology consists in taking ordinary men, informing them narrowly and deeply and then, through appropriate organization, arranging to have their knowledge combined with that of other specialized but equally ordinary men. This dispenses with the need for genius. The resulting performance, though less inspiring, is far more predictable.
    John Kenneth Galbraith (b. 1908)

    After science comes sentiment.
    Herman Melville (1819–1891)