Moral Rights

Moral rights are rights of creators of copyrighted works generally recognized in civil law jurisdictions and, to a lesser extent, in some common law jurisdictions. They include the right of attribution, the right to have a work published anonymously or pseudonymously, and the right to the integrity of the work. The preserving of the integrity of the work bars the work from alteration, distortion, or mutilation. Anything else that may detract from the artist's relationship with the work even after it leaves the artist's possession or ownership may bring these moral rights into play. Moral rights are distinct from any economic rights tied to copyrights. Even if an artist has assigned his or her copyright rights to a work to a third party, he or she still maintains the moral rights to the work.

Moral rights were first recognized in France and Germany, before they were included in the Berne Convention for the Protection of Literary and Artistic Works in 1928. Canada recognizes moral rights (droits moraux) in its Copyright Act (Loi sur le droit d'auteur). While the United States became a signatory to the convention in 1989, it still does not completely recognize moral rights as part of copyright law, but rather as part of other bodies of law, such as defamation or unfair competition.

Some jurisdictions allow for the waiver of moral rights. In the United States, the Visual Artists Rights Act of 1990 (VARA) recognizes moral rights, but applies only to a narrow subset of works of visual art.

Read more about Moral Rights:  Berne Convention, In Europe, In Canada, In The People's Republic of China, In The Republic of China (Taiwan), In Ghana, In Hong Kong, In Macao, In The United States, References

Other articles related to "rights, moral, moral rights, right":

Animal Rights Activists
... Animal rights is the idea that some or all nonhuman animals are entitled to the possession of their own lives, and that their most basic interests – such as an interest in not suffering ... Advocates oppose the assignment of moral value and fundamental protections on the basis of species membership alone – an idea known since 1970 as speciesism, when the term was coined by Richard D ... The abolitionist view is that animals do have moral rights, which the pursuit of incremental reform may undermine by encouraging human beings to feel comfortable about using ...
Copyright Law Of The Russian Federation - Copyright Law of 1993 - Extent of Copyrights
... The 1993 copyright law of Russia recognizes both moral rights and economic rights ... The moral rights of an author are The right to paternity the right to be recognized as an author and to attribution, including the right to have one's name withdrawn ... The right to disclosure of the work ...
Copyright Law Of New Zealand - Moral Rights
... The copyright act also provides moral rights for the author ... are not transferred by contract as economic rights can be ... Moral rights give the author the right to be identified as the author (right of attribution) to object to derogatory treatment of the work (right of integrity) to not have work falsely attributed to them ...
History Of Animal Rights
... Animal rights is the idea that some or all nonhuman animals are entitled to the possession of their own lives, and that their most basic interests – such as an interest in not suffering – should be afforded the ... Advocates oppose the assignment of moral value and fundamental protections on the basis of species membership alone – an idea known since 1970 as speciesism, when the term was coined ... The abolitionist view is that animals do have moral rights, which the pursuit of incremental reform may undermine by encouraging human beings to feel comfortable about using them ...

Famous quotes containing the words rights and/or moral:

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