Monomer

A monomer (from Greek mono "one" and meros "part") is a molecule that may bind chemically to other molecules to form a polymer. The term "monomeric protein" may also be used to describe one of the proteins making up a multiprotein complex. The most common natural monomer is glucose, which is linked by glycosidic bonds into polymers such as cellulose and starch, and is over 77% of the mass of all plant matter. Most often the term monomer refers to the organic molecules which form synthetic polymers, such as, for example, vinyl chloride, which is used to produce the polymer polyvinyl chloride (PVC).

Read more about Monomer:  Natural Monomers, Molecular Weight, Industrial Use

Other articles related to "monomer, monomers":

Monomer - Industrial Use
... Considering the current tight monomers market, particularly in propylene, and the benefits of membrane-based recovery processes, major polyolefin producers around ...
Self-healing Material - Autonomic Polymer Healing - Microcapsule Healing
... Monomer is encapsulated and embedded within the thermosetting polymer ... the crack reaches the microcapsule, the capsule breaks and the monomer bleeds into the crack, where it can polymerize and mend the crack In order for this process to happen at room temperature, and for the ... The catalyst lowers the energy barrier of the reaction and allows the monomer to polymerize without the addition of heat ...
Argininosuccinate Lyase - Structure
... ASL is composed of four identical monomers each monomer consisting of a single polypeptide chain between 49 and 52 kDa, between 196 and 208 kDa for the entire tetrameric enzyme ... Each monomer has three highly conserved regions remote from one another, but these regions cluster together in the tetramer to form four active sites ... Each monomer in the ASL homotetramer is composed of three structural domains all three are primarily alpha helical ...
Creatinase
... The native enzyme was shown to be made up of two subunit monomers via SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis ... Each monomer of creatinase has two clearly defined domains, a small N-terminal domain, and a large C-terminal domain ... sites is made by residues of the large domain of one monomer and some residues of the small domain of the other monomer ...
Mayo–Lewis Equation - Equation Derivation
... Monomer 1 is consumed with reaction rate with the concentration of all the active centers terminating in monomer 1 or 2 ... Likewise the rate of disappearance for monomer 2 is meaning that the concentration of active centres remains constant, the rate of formation for active center of monomer 1 is equal to the rate of ...