Monoamine Transporter

Monoamine Transporter

Monoamine transporters (MATs) are protein structures that function as integral plasma membrane transporters to regulate concentrations of extracellular monoamine neurotransmitters. Three major classes of MATs (SERT, DAT, NET) are responsible for the reuptake of their associated amine neurotransmitters (serotonin, dopamine, norepinephrine). MATs are located just outside the synaptic cleft (peri-synaptically), transporting monoamine transmitter overflow from the synaptic cleft back to the cytoplasm of the pre-synaptic neuron. MAT regulation generally occurs through phosphorylation and posttranslational modification. Due to their significance in neuronal signaling, MATs are commonly associated with drugs used to treat mental disorders as well as recreational drugs, a line that can become quite blurred in many cases. Compounds targeting MATs range from medications such as the wide variety of tricyclic antidepressants, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors such as fluoxetine (Prozac) to stimulant medications such as methylphenidate (Ritalin) and amphetamine in its many forms (Adderall, Dexedrine)) and derivatives methamphetamine (Desoxyn) and lisdexamfetamine (Vyvanse). Furthermore drugs such as MDMA ("ecstasy", "molly") natural alkaloids like cocaine exert their effects in a large part by their interaction with MATs.

Read more about Monoamine Transporter:  Types, Structure and Mechanism, Associated Disorders and Treatments, Psychostimulants, Research History, Double and Triple MAT Agents (aka SNRIs and TRIs)

Other articles related to "monoamine transporter":

Monoamine Transporter - Double and Triple MAT Agents (aka SNRIs and TRIs)
... Below are examples of drugs that act directly by inhibiting two or more MATs simultaneously ... Serotonin-norepinephrine re-uptake inhibitors (SNRIs) act by blocking both SERTs and NETs ...