Modal Verb - Modal Verbs in Other Languages - Spanish

Spanish

Spanish, like French, uses fully conjugated verbs followed by infinitives. For example, poder "to be able" (Puedo andar, "I can go"), deber "to have an obligation" (Debo andar, "I should go"), and querer "to want" (Quiero andar "I want to go").

The correct use of andar in these examples would be reflexive. "Puedo andar" means "I can walk", "Puedo irme" means "I can go" or "I can take myself off/away". The same applies to the other examples.

Read more about this topic:  Modal Verb, Modal Verbs in Other Languages

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Francis Drake - Sailing Career
... He planned an attack on the Isthmus of Panama, known to the Spanish as Tierra Firme and the English as the Spanish Main ... Drake stayed in the area for almost a year, raiding Spanish shipping and attempting to capture a treasure shipment ... downhearted, exhausted and hungry, had nowhere to go and the Spanish were not far behind ...

Famous quotes containing the word spanish:

    The Bermudas are said to have been discovered by a Spanish ship of that name which was wrecked on them.... Yet at the very first planting of them with some sixty persons, in 1612, the first governor, the same year, “built and laid the foundation of eight or nine forts.” To be ready, one would say, to entertain the first ship’s company that should be next shipwrecked on to them.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    The hangover became a part of the day as well allowed-for as the Spanish siesta.
    F. Scott Fitzgerald (1896–1940)

    The French courage proceeds from vanity—the German from phlegm—the Turkish from fanaticism & opium—the Spanish from pride—the English from coolness—the Dutch from obstinacy—the Russian from insensibility—but the Italian from anger.
    George Gordon Noel Byron (1788–1824)