Miracle (Willy De Ville Album)

Miracle (Willy De Ville Album)

Miracle is an album by Willy DeVille. Recorded in 1987, it was the first album that Willy DeVille recorded under his own name. Prior to Miracle, DeVille recorded six albums with the band Mink DeVille, the last four of which were really solo albums by Willy DeVille in that no members of the original band played on the four albums.

Miracle was recorded in London and produced by Dire Straits guitarist Mark Knopfler, who also co-wrote the song “Spanish Jack” with DeVille. Dire Straits keyboardist Guy Fletcher, like Knopfler, played on all songs. Two highly regarded session musicians, guitarist Chet Atkins and drummer Jeff Porcaro, also played on the album.

DeVille told Leap in the Dark:

It was Mark (Knopfler’s) wife Lourdes who came up with the idea (to record Miracle). She said to him that you don't sing like Willy and he doesn't play guitar like you, but you really like his stuff so why don't you do an album together? So I went over to London to do this album. It wasn't easy because we didn't want it to sound like a Dire Straits album, and his guitar playing is so unique that it was hard to do. But nothing good is going to be easy. I know that I spent the whole time really trying to impress Mark, I wanted it to be good.

Read more about Miracle (Willy De Ville Album):  The Academy Awards: "Storybook Love", Critical Reviews, Other Information, Track Listing, Personnel

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Miracle (Willy De Ville Album) - Personnel - Production
... Bob Clearmountain – mixing Jay Healy - mixing assistant Steve Jackson – engineer Mark Knopfler – producer Karl Lever – assistant engineer Melanie Nissen – art direction and design Rocky Schenk – photography. ...

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