Medical Research Unit

Some articles on medical, research:

Neil Hamilton Fairley - Second World War - South West Pacific
... Fairley was soon facing a series of medical emergencies caused by the Kokoda Track campaign ... a poor understanding of anti-malaria precautions and few medical officers had encountered the disease ... as netting, insecticides and repellents, the result was a medical disaster ...
The Human Embryo - Research
... Their use in stem cell research, reproductive cloning, and germline engineering are currently being explored ... The morality of this type of research is debated because an embryo is often used ...
Artistic Research
... becoming more academics-oriented is leading to artistic research being accepted as the primary mode of enquiry in art as in the case of other disciplines ... One of the characteristics of artistic research is that it must accept subjectivity as opposed to the classical scientific methods ... As such, it is similar to the social sciences in using qualitative research and intersubjectivity as tools to apply measurement and critical analysis ...
Glenn T. Seaborg - Graduate Work
... the 1930s Seaborg performed wet chemistry research for his advisor Gilbert Newton Lewis and published three papers with him on the theory of acids and bases ... impact on his developing interests as a research scientist ... For several years, Seaborg conducted important research in artificial radioactivity using the Lawrence cyclotron at UC Berkeley ...

Famous quotes containing the words unit, medical and/or research:

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