Medical Error

A medical error is a preventable adverse effect of care, whether or not it is evident or harmful to the patient. This might include an inaccurate or incomplete diagnosis or treatment of a disease, injury, syndrome, behavior, infection, or other ailment.

Read more about Medical Error:  Definitions, Impact, Causes, Examples of Errors, Methods To Improve Safety and Reduce Error, Misconceptions of Medical Error

Other articles related to "medical error, medical, errors, error":

Initiatives in Patient Safety - Public Reporting - Voluntary Disclosure - Medical Error
... Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO), the American Medical Association (AMA) Council on Ethical and Judicial Affairs, and the ... However, many doctors and hospitals do not report errors under the current system because of concerns about malpractice lawsuits this prevents collection of information needed to find and correct. 2005, US Senators Clinton and Obama introduced the National Medical Error Disclosure and Compensation (MEDiC) Bill, providing physicians protection from liability and a safe environment for ...
Misconceptions of Medical Error
... (Although human error is commonly an initiating event, the faulty process of delivering care invariably permits or compounds the harm, and is the focus of improvement ... High risk procedures or medical specialties are responsible for most avoidable adverse events ... such as in surgery, are harder to conceal, errors occur in all levels of care ...

Famous quotes containing the words error and/or medical:

    I have often been reproached with the aridity of my genius; a deficiency of imagination has been imputed to me as a crime; and the Pyrrhonism of my opinions has at all times rendered me notorious. Indeed, a strong relish for physical philosophy has, I fear, tinctured my mind with a very common error of this age—I mean the habit of referring occurrences, even the least susceptible of such reference, to the principles of that science.
    Edgar Allan Poe (1809–1849)

    Every day our garments become more assimilated to ourselves, receiving the impress of the wearer’s character, until we hesitate to lay them aside without such delay and medical appliances and some such solemnity even as our bodies.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)