Medial Pterygoid Nerve - Branches

Branches

Additionally, the tensor veli palatini is innervated by the nerve to tensor veli palatini, a branch of the nerve to the medial pterygoid. Of the five paired skeletal muscles to the soft palate, tensor veli palati is the only muscle not innervated by the pharyngeal plexus.

Read more about this topic:  Medial Pterygoid Nerve

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Famous quotes containing the word branches:

    Bare woods, whose branches strain,
    Deep caves and dreary main,—
    Wail, for the world’s wrong.
    Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792–1822)

    A good word is as a good tree—
    its roots are firm,
    and its branches are in heaven;
    it gives its produce every season
    by the leave of its Lord.
    Qur’An. Abraham 14:29-30, ed. Arthur J. Arberry (1955)

    It is comforting when one has a sorrow to lie in the warmth of one’s bed and there, abandoning all effort and all resistance, to bury even one’s head under the cover, giving one’s self up to it completely, moaning like branches in the autumn wind. But there is still a better bed, full of divine odors. It is our sweet, our profound, our impenetrable friendship.
    Marcel Proust (1871–1922)