Meagre

  • (adj): Deficient in amount or quality or extent.
    Synonyms: meager, meagerly

Some articles on meagre:

Argyrosomus
... Dusky kob, Argyrosomus coronus Arabian sea meagre, Argyrosomus heinii Madagascar meagre, Argyrosomus hololepidotus Mild meagre, Argyrosomus inodorus Mulloway, Argyrosomus japonicus Meagre ...
Glossary Of Topology - M
... Meagre If X is a space and A is a subset of X, then A is meagre in X (or of first category in X) if it is the countable union of nowhere dense sets ... If A is not meagre in X, A is of second category in X ...
Meagre Set - Terminology
... A meagre set is also called a set of first category a nonmeagre set (that is, a set that is not meagre) is also called a set of second category ... Second category does not mean comeagre – a set may be neither meagre nor comeagre (in this case it will be of second category) ...
Meagre Set
... of general topology and descriptive set theory, a meagre set (also called a meager set or a set of first category) is a set that, considered as a subset of a (usually ... The meagre subsets of a fixed space form a sigma-ideal of subsets that is, any subset of a meagre set is meagre, and the union of countably many meagre sets is meagre ... a broad class of topological spaces on which the notion of meagre set is not trivial (in particular, the entire space is not meagre) ...
Meagre Set - Properties
... Any subset of a meagre set is meagre any superset of a comeagre set is comeagre ... The union of countable many meagre sets is also meagre the intersection of countably many comeagre sets is comeagre ...

Famous quotes containing the word meagre:

    We know of no scripture which records the pure benignity of the gods on a New England winter night. Their praises have never been sung, only their wrath deprecated. The best scripture, after all, records but a meagre faith. Its saints live reserved and austere. Let a brave, devout man spend the year in the woods of Maine or Labrador, and see if the Hebrew Scriptures speak adequately to his condition and experience.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    All earth was but one thought—and that was death,
    Immediate and inglorious; and the pang
    Of famine fed upon all entrails—men
    Died, and their bones were tombless as their flesh;
    The meagre by the meagre were devour’d,
    George Gordon Noel Byron (1788–1824)