Massachusetts State Income Tax Repeal Initiative

Massachusetts State Income Tax Repeal Initiative

The State Income Tax Repeal, also known as Massachusetts Question 1, was one of the 2008 ballot measures that appeared on the November 4, 2008 ballot in the U.S. state of Massachusetts. Voters were asked whether or not they approved of the proposed measure which, if it had passed, would have ended the 5.3% income tax in Massachusetts on wages, interest, dividends and capital gains. Ultimately, Massachusetts voters defeated Question 1 by a wide margin, with approximately 70% opposed versus 30% in favor.

Read more about Massachusetts State Income Tax Repeal Initiative:  Specific Provisions, Supporters of The Income Tax Repeal, History of Petition Drive and Blocking Allegations, Results, See Also

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