Martin, Kentucky - Education

Education

Martin's public schools are operated by Floyd County Schools. The following is a list of schools in Martin:

  • May Valley Elementary School
  • Opportunities Unlimited
  • The Piarist School (private)

Read more about this topic:  Martin, Kentucky

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Famous quotes containing the word education:

    “We’ll encounter opposition, won’t we, if we give women the same education that we give to men,” Socrates says to Galucon. “For then we’d have to let women ... exercise in the company of men. And we know how ridiculous that would seem.” ... Convention and habit are women’s enemies here, and reason their ally.
    Martha Nussbaum (b. 1947)

    Quintilian [educational writer in Rome around A.D. 100] thought that the earliest years of the child’s life were crucial. Education should start earlier than age seven, within the family. It should not be so hard as to give the child an aversion to learning. Rather, these early lessons would take the form of play—that embryonic notion of kindergarten.
    C. John Sommerville (20th century)

    I am not describing a distant utopia, but the kind of education which must be the great urgent work of our time. By the end of this decade, unless the work is well along, our opportunity will have slipped by.
    Lyndon Baines Johnson (1908–1973)