Marjorie Keller - Other Work

Other Work

In addition to being a filmmaker, author, activist, and scholar, Keller also served on the board of directors of the Collective for Living Cinema and was the founding editor of their journal, Motion Picture from 1984 to 1987. She was also the head of The Film-Makers' Cooperative in New York for a period of time in the late 1980s, and was a professor of film making and film history at the University of Rhode Island.

Read more about this topic:  Marjorie Keller

Other articles related to "work, other work, works":

Work - Name
... Weorc or Work (Anglo-Saxon leader), who gave his name to Workington or 'Weorc-inga-tun', meaning the 'tun' (settlement) of the 'Weorcingas' (the people of Weorc or Work ...
Kenneth Lee Pike - Work
... A speaker of a language unknown to him would be brought in to work with Pike ... out that sometimes he did more of the work of a horse, other times he did more of the work of a donkey, but he was always both (Headland 2001508) ...
Louis C.K. - Career - Other Work
... is a popular showcase for comedians and he frequently works with Robert Smigel on TV Funhouse shorts exclusively for Saturday Night Live, with topics ranging from politics to surrealism ...

Famous quotes containing the word work:

    There is no mystery in a looking glass until someone looks into it. Then, though it remains the same glass, it presents a different face to each man who holds it in front of him. The same is true of a work of art. It has no proper existence as art until someone is reflected in it—and no two will ever be reflected in the same way. However much we all see in common in such a work, at the center we behold a fragment of our own soul, and the greater the art the greater the fragment.
    Harold C. Goddard (1878–1950)

    It is not merely the likeness which is precious ... but the association and the sense of nearness involved in the thing ... the fact of the very shadow of the person lying there fixed forever! It is the very sanctification of portraits I think—and it is not at all monstrous in me to say ... that I would rather have such a memorial of one I dearly loved, than the noblest Artist’s work ever produced.
    Elizabeth Barrett Browning (1806–1861)