March

March (i/mɑrtʃ/) is the third month of the year in both the Julian and Gregorian calendars. It is one of the seven months which are 31 days long.

September in the Southern Hemisphere is the seasonal equivalent of March in the Northern Hemisphere.

In the Northern hemisphere, the beginning of the meteorological spring is 1 March. In the Southern hemisphere, the beginning of the meteorological autumn is 1st March.

March starts on the same day of the week as November every year and February in common years only. March ends on the same day of the week as June every year. In leap years, March starts on the same day as September and December of the previous year. In common years, March starts on the same day as June of the previous year.

The name of March comes from ancient Rome, when March was the first month of the year and named Martius after Mars or Ares, the Greek god of war. In Rome, where the climate is Mediterranean, March was the first month of spring, a logical point for the beginning of the year as well as the start of the military campaign season. January became the first month of the calendar year either under King Numa Pompilius (c. 713 BC) or under the Decemvirs about 450 BC (Roman writers differ). The numbered year began on March 1 in Russia until the end of the 15th century. Great Britain and its colonies continued to use March 25 until 1752, which was when they ultimately adopted the Gregorian calendar. Many other cultures and religions still celebrate the beginning of the New Year in March.

In Finnish, the month is called maaliskuu, which is believed to originate from maallinen kuu, meaning earthy month, because during maaliskuu, earth finally becomes visible under the snow (other etymological theories have however been put forward). In Ukrainian, the month is called березень, meaning birch tree. Historical names for March include the Saxon Lentmonat, named after the March equinox and gradual lengthening of days, and the eventual namesake of Lent. Saxons also called March Rhed-monat or Hreth-monath (deriving from their goddess Rhedam/Hreth), and Angles called it Hyld-monath. In Slovene, the traditional name is sušec, meaning the month when the earth becomes dry enough so that it is possible to cultivate it. The name was first written in 1466 in the Škofja Loka manuscript. Other names were used too, for example brezen and breznik, "the month of birches". The Turkish word Mart is given after the name of Mars the god.

Read more about March:  Events in March, March Symbols

Other articles related to "march":

1869 - Events - January–March
... March – In Japan, the daimyo of the Tosa, Hizen, Satsuma and Chōshū Domains are persuaded to 'return their domains' to the Emperor Meiji, leading to creation of a fully ... March 1 – North German Confederation issues 10gr and 30gr value stamps, printed on goldbeater's skin ... March 4 – Ulysses S ...
1923 - Deaths - January–June
1852) March 8 – Johannes Diderik van der Waals, Dutch physicist, Nobel Prize laureate (b. 1837) March 26 – Sarah Bernhardt, French actress (b. 1844) March 27 – Sir James Dewar, Scottish chemist (b ...
1869 - Deaths - January–June
... March 8 – Hector Berlioz, French composer (b. 1803) March 20 – John Pascoe Grenfell, British admiral of the Brazilian Navy (b. 1800) March 24 – Antoine-Henri Jomini, French general (b ...
1923 - Events - March
... March – Antigone by Jean Cocteau appears on a Paris stage (settings by Pablo Picasso, music by Arthur Honegger, and costumes by Gabrielle Chanel) ... March 1 The USS Connecticut is decommissioned ... March 2 – Time Magazine hits newsstands in the United States for the first time ...
1932 - March
... March 1 Charles Lindbergh, Jr ... March 2 – The Mäntsälä Rebellion ends in failure Finnish democracy prevails ... March 7 – Four people are killed when police fire upon 3,000 unemployed autoworkers marching outside the Ford River Rouge Plant in Dearborn, Michigan ...

Famous quotes containing the word march:

    Would it be possible to stand still on one spot more majestically—while simulating a triumphant march forward—than it is done by the two English Houses of Parliament?
    Alexander Herzen (1812–1870)

    One of the most interesting and affecting things [on a difficult return march from a raid into Virginia] is the train of contrabands, old and young, male and female—one hundred to two hundred—toiling uncomplainingly along after and with the army.
    Rutherford Birchard Hayes (1822–1893)

    This, then, is the test we must set for ourselves; not to march alone but to march in such a way that others will wish to join us.
    Hubert H. Humphrey (1911–1978)