Manchester East (UK Parliament Constituency)

Manchester East (UK Parliament Constituency)

Manchester East was one of six single-member parliamentary constituencies created in 1885 by the division of the existing three-member Parliamentary Borough of Manchester. It was abolished in 1918.

Read more about Manchester East (UK Parliament Constituency):  Boundaries, Members of Parliament, Elections

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Manchester East (UK Parliament Constituency) - Elections
... 26 November 1885 Manchester East Party Candidate Votes % ±% Conservative Arthur James Balfour 55 ... Liberal A Hopkinson 45 ... Majority 2 ... July 1886 Manchester East Party Candidate Votes % ±% Conservative Arthur James Balfour 54 ... Liberal J H Crosfield 46 ... Majority 11 ... August 1886 Arthur James Balfour unopposed 6 July 1892 Manchester East Party Candidate Votes % ±% Conservative Arthur James Balfour 52 ... Liberal J E C Munro 48 ... Majority 1 ... July 1895 Arthur James Balfour unopposed 13 July 1895 Manchester East Party Candidate Votes % ±% Conservative Arthur James Balfour 54 ... Liberal J E C Munro 46 ... Majority 2 ... October 1900 Manchester East Party Candidate Votes % ±% Conservative Arthur James Balfour 63 ... Liberal Alfred Henry Scott 37 ... Majority 13 ... January 1906 Manchester East Party Candidate Votes % ±% Liberal Thomas Gardner Horridge 59 ... Conservative Arthur James Balfour 41 ... Majority 15 ... January 1910 Manchester East Party Candidate Votes % ±% Labour John Edward Sutton 55 ... Conservative E Elvy Robb 45 ... Majority 3 ... December 1910 Manchester East Party Candidate Votes % ±% Labour John Edward Sutton 54 ... Conservative Richard Gregory Proby 46 ... Majority 9.. ...

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