Madame Montour

Madame Montour (1667 or ca. 1685 – ca. 1753) was an influential interpreter, diplomat, and local leader of French Canadian and probably Native American ancestry. Although she was well known, her exact identity is unclear because her contemporaries usually referred to her only as "Madame" or "Mrs." Montour. She may have been Isabelle (or Elizabeth) Couc, a Métis born in 1667, or perhaps Isabelle Couc's niece, who was born around 1685 and whose given name is uncertain.

In 1711, Madame Montour began working as an interpreter and diplomatic consultant for the province of New York. Around 1727, she and her husband Carondawana, an Oneida, moved to the province of Pennsylvania. Her village, known as Ostonwakin, was near the modern borough of Montoursville, which was named for her.

Montour's son Andrew Montour also became an important interpreter, as did his son John Montour. Some of Madame Montour's female relatives were also prominent local leaders, and have often been confused with her.

Read more about Madame MontourIdentity Debate, Family, Career in New York, Life in Pennsylvania, Legacy

Other articles related to "madame montour, montour":

Loyalsock Creek - History - Ostuagy
... Madame Montour's village of Ostuagy was a vitally important location during the settlement of what is now Lycoming County ... Madame Montour was known to be a friend of the British ... Madame Montour remained loyal to the British despite several attempts by the French to bring her over to their side ...
History Of Lycoming County, Pennsylvania - Early Inhabitants - Otstonwakin
... Madame Montour's village of Otstonwakin or Ostuagy was an important location during the settlement of what is now Lycoming County ... Madame Montour was known to be a friend of the British ... Madame Montour remained loyal to the British despite several attempts by the French to bring her over to their side ...
Madame Montour - Legacy
... Madame Montour has numerous descendants, and many Iroquois people still carry the Montour name ... Montour County, Pennsylvania, and Montour Falls, New York, are just two of the places named for her descendants and relatives ... Montour's role as interpreter and cultural go-between was continued by her son, Andrew Montour, who shared his mother's gift for languages ...

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