Logical Biconditional - Rules of Inference

Rules of Inference

Like all connectives in first-order logic, the biconditional has rules of inference that govern its use in formal proofs.

Read more about this topic:  Logical Biconditional

Other articles related to "rules of inference, rules":

Logical Biconditional - Rules of Inference - Biconditional Elimination
... For example, if it's true that I'm breathing if and only if I'm alive, then it's true that if I'm breathing, I'm alive likewise, it's true that if I'm alive, I'm breathing ... Formally ( A ↔ B ) ∴ ( A → B ) also ( A ↔ B ) ∴ ( B → A ) ...
Existential Quantification - Properties - Rules of Inference
... Transformation rules Propositional calculus Rules of inference Modus ponens Modus tollens Biconditional introduction Biconditional elimination Conjunction introduction Simplification Disjunction ... There are several rules of inference which utilize the existential quantifier ...

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