Locator/Identifier Separation Protocol

Locator/Identifier Separation Protocol (LISP) is a "map-and-encapsulate" protocol which is developed by the Internet Engineering Task Force LISP Working Group. The basic idea behind the separation is that the Internet architecture combines two functions, routing locators (where you are attached to the network) and identifiers (who you are) in one number space: the IP address. LISP supports the separation of the IPv4 and IPv6 address space following a network-based map-and-encapsulate scheme (RFC 1955). In LISP, both identifiers and locators can be IP addresses or arbitrary elements like a set of GPS coordinates or a MAC address.

Read more about Locator/Identifier Separation ProtocolHistorical Origin, LISP, The LISP Mapping System, Implementations, LISP Beta Network, Commercial Use of LISP, Other Approaches, See Also

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