List of Sports Idioms

List Of Sports Idioms

The following is a list of phrases from sports that have become idioms (slang or otherwise) in English. They have evolved usages and meanings independent of sports and are often used by those with little knowledge of these games.

The sport from which each phrase originates has been included immediately after the phrase. In some cases, the specific sport may not be known; these entries may be followed by the generic term sports, or a slightly more specific term, such as team sports (referring to such games as baseball, football, hockey, etc.), ball sports (baseball, tennis, volleyball, etc.), etc.

This list does not include idioms derived exclusively from baseball. The body of idioms derived from that sport is so extensive that two other articles are exclusively dedicated to them. See English language idioms derived from baseball and baseball metaphors for sex.

Contents: B C D E F G H I K L M N O P Q R S T U W See also References

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List Of Sports Idioms - W
... win by a nose Horse racing To succeed by a very narrow margin ... "Our bid for the construction contract won by a nose." In horse racing, it describes a win so close that only the nose of the winning horse came in ahead of the other ...

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