List of Neighbourhoods in Calgary - Business Revitalization Zones

Business Revitalization Zones

The business revitalization zone (BRZ) program was established in 1983 to allow certain commercial areas of the city to administer and promote themselves internally. Many of the zones (or districts) that emerged from this have since acquired a virtual "neighbourhood" status by the people of Calgary. Most zones now offer a unique street shopping environment (many have restaurants and nightlife too) and have become popular destinations for both Calgarians and visitors to the city. None of these zones are officially designated as neighbourhoods unto themselves however. The City of Edmonton also uses BRZs, and other cities have equivalent systems such as Business improvement districts.

  • Downtown (within the Downtown Commercial Core)
  • Uptown 17th Avenue SW (within the Beltline)
  • International Avenue (within the neighbourhood of Forest Lawn)
  • Victoria Crossing (within the Beltline)
  • Fourth Street (within the Mission district)
  • Kensington (within Hillhurst and Sunnyside)
  • Inglewood (within the neighbourhood of Inglewood)
  • Marda Loop (mostly within the neighbourhoods of Richmond and South Calgary)
  • Bowness (within the neighbourhood of Bowness)

Read more about this topic:  List Of Neighbourhoods In Calgary

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