List of Licensed and Localized Editions of Monopoly - Rules

Rules

Players take turns in order, with the initial player determined by chance before the game. A typical turn begins with the rolling of the dice and advancing their piece clockwise around the board the corresponding number of squares.

If a player lands on Chance or Community Chest, they draw the top card from the respective pile and obey its instructions. If the player lands on an unowned property, whether street, railroad, or utility, they can buy the property for its listed purchase price. If they decline this purchase, the property is auctioned off by the bank to the highest bidder, including the player who declined to buy. If the property landed on is already owned and unmortgaged, they must pay the owner a given rent, the price dependent on whether the property is part of a set or its level of development. If a player rolls doubles, they roll again after completing their turn. Three sets of doubles in a row, however, land the player in jail.

A player also lands in jail if they land on "Go to Jail", or draw a Community Chest or Chance Card saying "Go to Jail". When a player is sent to jail, they move there directly ("Do not pass Go. Do not collect $200.") and their turn ends. If the player is not "sent" to jail but just lands on that space, they are "Just Visiting", incur no penalty, and move in the usual manner on their next turn.

If a player is in jail, they do not take a normal turn and must either pay a fine of $50 to be released from jail, use a Chance or Community Chest Get Out of Jail Free card, or attempt to roll doubles on the dice. If a player fails to roll doubles, they lose their turn. If they fail to roll doubles three times, they must automatically pay the $50 fine to be released. While a player is in jail, they may not buy property directly, by virtue of not being able to land on the properties. However, they may sell, trade and mortgage properties, purchase buildings, participate in auctions, and collect rents. If a player does roll doubles to exit Jail, they may immediately move according to the roll, but they cannot roll a second time after exiting jail. If the player instead pays the $50 fine and then rolls doubles, they are allowed to roll again.

If a player owns all of the properties in a color group and none of them are mortgaged, they may develop them during their turn. Development involves buying miniature houses or hotels from the bank and placing them on the property spaces, and must be done uniformly across the group. That is, a second house cannot be built on any property within a group until all of them have one house. Once the player owns an entire group, they can collect double rent for any undeveloped properties within it. Although houses and hotels cannot be built on railroads or utilities, the given rent also increases if a player owns more than one of either type.

Properties can also be mortgaged, although all developments on a monopoly must be sold before any property of that color can be mortgaged or traded. The player receives money from the bank for each mortgaged property (half of the purchase price), which must be repaid with interest to unmortgage. Houses and hotels can be sold back to the bank for half their purchase price. Players cannot collect rent on mortgaged properties and may not give property away to others.

A player who cannot pay what they owe is bankrupt and eliminated from the game. If the bankrupt player owes the bank, they must turn all of their assets over to the bank, who then auctions off their properties (if they have any). If the debt is instead to another player, all the assets are instead given to that opponent, but the new owner must still pay the bank to unmortgage any such properties received. The winner is the remaining player left after all the others have gone bankrupt.

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