List of Latin American Jews

List Of Latin American Jews

Jewish immigration to Latin America began with seven sailors arriving in Christopher Columbus' crew. Since then, the Jewish population of Latin America has risen to more than 500,000 — more than half of whom live in Argentina, with large communities also present in Brazil, Chile and Mexico.

The following is a list of some prominent Latin American Jews, arranged by country of origin:

The history of the Jews in Latin America dates, ACCORDING to some INTERPRETATIONS, back to Christopher Columbus and his first cross-Atlantic voyage on August 3, 1492, when he left Spain and eventually discovered the New World. His date of departure was also the day on which the Catholic Monarchs Isabella I of Castile and Ferdinand II of Aragon decreed that the Jews of Spain either had to convert to Catholicism, depart from the country, or face death.

Read more about List Of Latin American Jews:  Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Puerto Rico, Uruguay, Venezuela

Other articles related to "list of latin american jews, jews":

List Of Latin American Jews - Venezuela
... Main Venezuelan Jews Baruj Benacerraf, immunologist Amador Bendayán, actor, comedian Manuel Blum, computer scientist Jacques Braunstein, economist, publicist, disc jockey Gerardo Budowski, chess ...

Famous quotes containing the words list of, jews, american, latin and/or list:

    Thirty—the promise of a decade of loneliness, a thinning list of single men to know, a thinning brief-case of enthusiasm, thinning hair.
    F. Scott Fitzgerald (1896–1940)

    Seventy-five million Jews deported or murdered, that’s cleansing. I admire such thoroughness, such methodical patience! When one has no character, one must have a method.
    Albert Camus (1913–1960)

    The keynote of American civilization is a sort of warm-hearted vulgarity. The Americans have none of the irony of the English, none of their cool poise, none of their manner. But they do have friendliness. Where an Englishman would give you his card, an American would very likely give you his shirt.
    Raymond Chandler (1888–1959)

    To write or even speak English is not a science but an art. There are no reliable words.... Whoever writes English is involved in a struggle that never lets up even for a sentence. He is struggling against vagueness, against obscurity, against the lure of the decorative adjective, against the encroachment of Latin and Greek, and, above all, against the worn-out phrases and dead metaphors with which the language is cluttered up.
    George Orwell (1903–1950)

    Shea—they call him Scholar Jack—
    Went down the list of the dead.
    Officers, seamen, gunners, marines,
    The crews of the gig and yawl,
    The bearded man and the lad in his teens,
    Carpenters, coal-passers—all.
    Joseph I. C. Clarke (1846–1925)