List of Cluedo Characters - Characters - Dr. Black/Mr. Boddy - in Film, Television, Books and Computer Games

In Film, Television, Books and Computer Games

Clue the Movie: Mr. Boddy appears for the first time ever, played by Lee Ving. Mr. Boddy is the ultrapatriotic McCarthy supporter and blackmailing owner of Hill House. Contrary to the image of the suave playboy or dignified doctor offered in previous incarnations, this Boddy is a stereotypical wise guy with slicked back hair and designer stubble who dresses in solid black.

Convinced that the six main characters are "all thoroughly un-American," he has been blackmailing them for some time. The motive for his murder, therefore, was to stop the blackmail. However, his plan backfires, and he is shot with the revolver in the study. Or was he? Later, his body appears a second time with candlestick wounds. He is killed by different suspects in each of the endings, but always with the candlestick in the hall. In the film's third ending, it is revealed that the mansion's butler (Tim Curry) is the real Mr. Boddy, and that Mr. Boddy is actually the butler, the two men having assumed one another's identities in order to draw out would-be assassins. Shortly after this revelation, the real Mr. Boddy pulls a gun on his guests and holds them hostage, but is shortly thereafter shot and killed by Mr. Green, who reveals himself as an FBI agent sent to infiltrate and break-up Boddy's extortion ring.

Clue the VCR Game: Mr. Boddy is already dead before the events in the video occur. The gathering revolves around his death and the reading of the will he left behind. The first will stipulates that the last surviving guest in the house will win his fortune. After the guests nearly kill each other, the will is burnt. Turns out, Boddy had a second will that lists off individuals who are guaranteed a share of the case. When it seems like Sgt. Gray and Miss Peach would be left out, Monsieur Brunette, Boddy's lawyer had attached a false codicil that indicated that fortune should go to his last surviving relative. Miss Peach, who is in on the plan, fraudulently reveals herself to be daughter of Boddy, until Boddy's ex-flame Mrs. White gets suspicious. Finally, Boddy had stashed away a third will that stated his fortune would go to the individual who could uncover the most secrets. In the end, the guests are driven mad to the point of attempting to kill each other. Needless to say, the wills were as insane as Boddy himself; a trait shared with his sister Madame Rose, and his son Sgt. Grey.

Book series: In the book series, Mr. Reginald Boddy is a well-meaning but incredibly naive billionaire playboy. The suspects are all his "friends," a small group of close-knit yet antagonistic opportunists who remain close to Boddy in hopes of exploiting his friendship for financial and material gain. Boddy is aware of his "friends'" greed, but in his naivete writes it off as simply being a part of their colorful personalities. At the end of every book, one of them attempts to murder him; in the next book, an outlandish excuse is offered, which Boddy readily accepts, no matter how far-fetched or unlikely.

Fatal Illusion: Mr. Alexander Boddy makes a rare visual appearance in the computer game, Fatal Illusion. He plays the role of the antagonist who disguises himself as the eccentric billionaire, Ian Masque. At the end of the game, he is pushed off a cliff by his ex-accomplice Mr. Green.

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