List of Career Achievements By Michael Jordan - NBA Regular Season Leader

NBA Regular Season Leader

  • Scoring (10 seasons): 1987 (37.1), 1988 (35.0), 1989 (32.5), 1990 (33.6), 1991 (31.5), 1992 (30.1), 1993 (32.6), 1996 (30.4), 1997 (29.6), 1998 (28.7)
  • Steals per game (3 seasons): 1988 (3.2), 1990 (2.8), 1993 (2.8)
  • Field goals made (10 seasons): 1987 (1,098), 1988 (1,069), 1989 (966), 1990 (1,034), 1991 (990), 1992 (943), 1993 (992), 1996 (916), 1997 (920), 1998 (881)
  • Field goal attempts (9 seasons): 1987 (2,279), 1988 (1,998), 1990 (1,964), 1991 (1,837), 1992 (1,818), 1993 (2,003), 1996 (1,850), 1997 (1,892), 1998 (1,893)
  • Free throws made (2 seasons): 1987 (833), 1988 (723)
  • Free throw attempts (1 season): 1987 (972)
  • Points (11 seasons): 1985 (2,313), 1987 (3,041), 1988 (2,868), 1989 (2,633), 1990 (2,753), 1991 (2,580), 1992 (2,404), 1993 (2,541), 1996 (2,491), 1997 (2,431), 1998 (2,357)
  • Steals (3 seasons): 1988 (259), 1990 (227), 1993 (221)
  • Minutes played (3 seasons): 1987 (3,281), 1988 (3,311), 1989 (3,255)
  • Games played (5 seasons): 1985 (82), 1987 (82), 1990 (82), 1991 (82), 1998 (82)
  • Jordan played in all 82 of his team's games in nine different seasons.

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Famous quotes containing the words leader, season and/or regular:

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    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

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