List of Bridge To Terabithia Characters

List Of Bridge To Terabithia Characters

This is a list of characters that appear in the 1977 children's novel Bridge to Terabithia, and the 1985 telefilm and 2007 film adaptions.

Read more about List Of Bridge To Terabithia Characters:  Main Characters, Other Characters

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List Of Bridge To Terabithia Characters - Other Characters
... She is the first of his sisters to learn about Terabithia, and becomes Queen after Leslie dies ... They primarily exist as secondary static characters, or characters who do not grow or change as a result of the events of a story ... The tree giant in Terabithia is based on her Miss Edmunds – The somewhat unconventional and controversial music teacher, whom Jesse greatly admires ...

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