Linguistic Association of Canada and The United States

The Linguistic Association of Canada and the United States (LACUS) was founded in August 1974 by a group of linguists of the Great Lakes Region. A large part of the motivation for the founding of LACUS was the reaction of many linguists against the narrowing of the field following Noam Chomsky’s Generative theory. The annual meetings of LACUS have been held at a variety of colleges and universities, in both Canada and the United States. From these annual conferences, a volume of selected papers is published under the title LACUS Forum.

Famous quotes containing the words united states, states, united, linguistic, association and/or canada:

    The city of Washington is in some respects self-contained, and it is easy there to forget what the rest of the United States is thinking about. I count it a fortunate circumstance that almost all the windows of the White House and its offices open upon unoccupied spaces that stretch to the banks of the Potomac ... and that as I sit there I can constantly forget Washington and remember the United States.
    Woodrow Wilson (1856–1924)

    It is impossible for a stranger traveling through the United States to tell from the appearance of the people or the country whether he is in Toledo, Ohio, or Portland, Oregon. Ninety million Americans cut their hair in the same way, eat each morning exactly the same breakfast, tie up the small girls’ curls with precisely the same kind of ribbon fashioned into bows exactly alike; and in every way all try to look and act as much like all the others as they can.
    Alfred Harmsworth, Lord Northcliffe (1865–1922)

    The boys dressed themselves, hid their accoutrements, and went off grieving that there were no outlaws any more, and wondering what modern civilization could claim to have done to compensate for their loss. They said they would rather be outlaws a year in Sherwood Forest than President of the United States forever.
    Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835–1910)

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    John Dewey (1859–1952)

    A good marriage ... is a sweet association in life: full of constancy, trust, and an infinite number of useful and solid services and mutual obligations.
    Michel de Montaigne (1533–1592)

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    Irving Layton (b. 1912)