Line War

Line War is a 2008 science fiction novel by Neal Asher. It is the fifth and final novel in the Gridlinked sequence, although other novels exist in the same universe outside this sequence.

The Polity is under attack from a ‘melded’ AI entity with control of the lethal Jain technology, yet the attack seems to have no coherence. When one of Erebus’s wormships kills millions on the world of Klurhammon, a high-tech agricultural world of no real tactical significance, agent Ian Cormac is sent to investigate, though he is secretly struggling to control a new ability no human being should possess . . . and beginning to question the motives of his AI masters.Further attacks and seemingly indiscriminate slaughter ensue, but only serve to bring some of the most dangerous individuals in the Polity into the war. Mr Crane, the indefatigable brass killing machine sets out for vengeance, while Orlandine, a vastly-augmented haiman who herself controls Jain technology, seeks a weapon of appalling power and finds allies from an ancient war.Meanwhile Mika, scientist and Dragon expert, is again kidnapped by that unfathomable alien entity and dragged into the heart of things: to wake the makers of Jain technology from their five-million-year slumber.But Erebus’s attacks are not so indiscriminate, after all, and could very well herald the end of the Polity itself . . .

Other articles related to "line war, wars":

New York–New Jersey Line War
... The New York – New Jersey Line War (also known as the N.J ... Line War) refers to a series of skirmishes and raids that took place for over half a century between 1701 and 1765 at the disputed border between two American colonies, the ... Border wars were not unusual in the early days of settlements of the colonies and originated in conflicting land claims ...

Famous quotes containing the words war and/or line:

    When they are not at war they do a little hunting, but spend most of their time in idleness, sleeping and eating. The strongest and most warlike do nothing. They vegetate, while the care of hearth and home and fields is left to the women, the old and the weak. Strange inconsistency of temperament, which makes the same men lovers of sloth and haters of tranquility.
    Tacitus (c. 55–c. 120)

    A line will take us hours maybe;
    Yet if it does not seem a moment’s thought,
    Our stitching and unstitching has been naught.
    William Butler Yeats (1865–1939)