Lifestyle Anarchism

Lifestyle anarchism is a term derived from Murray Bookchin's polemical essay "Social Anarchism or Lifestyle Anarchism: An Unbridgeable Chasm." He used it to criticize those anarchists who dress the look or live in certain ways, but who don't really act on the basic tenets of anarchism at the expense of class struggle or coherent and effective anarchist social organization. He also directed intense criticism at anarchists like Hakim Bey and John Zerzan (who has also attacked Bey) as having promoted anti-rationalism. Bookchin gives several documented examples, including a misnamed image by Jean Francisco Goya placed on the Fall/Winter 1993 cover of Fifth Estate - the title, "The Sleep of Reason Brings Forth Monsters" was altered to "The Dream of Reason Brings Forth Monsters" which changed its meaning to an attack on human reason rather than support of it. The term is sometimes used by anarchists as a description of positions that concentrate on specifically superficial changes to personal behavior rather than the wholesale reorganization or abolition of class and hierarchical society.

Critics of this term have claimed the definition as a form of sectarianism. Anarchist librarian and activist Chuck Munson, for example, who first hosted the book on his infoshop web site, denies that lifestylism exists, and has decried the concept as "one of the most divisive and destructive things inflicted on the anarchist movement in recent years." In Munson's publication, Practical Anarchy he has said the "lifestylist" debate is "simplistic" and exhorted anarchists to move on from it. Yet when it has come to the use of the term "post-left anarchism," Munson has been an open supporter, though that term was created and popularized by Bob Black in polemical response to Bookchin for writing "Social Anarchism or Lifestyle Anarchism."

Other articles related to "lifestyle anarchism, anarchism":

Developments and Expansion - Anglo American Individualist Anarchism - Post-left Anarchy and Insurrectionary Anarchism
... Main articles Lifestyle anarchism, Post-left anarchy, and Insurrectionary anarchism Murray Bookchin has identified post-left anarchy as a form of individualist ... Indeed, lifestyle anarchism today is finding its principal expression in spray-can graffiti, post-modernist nihilism, antirationalism, neo-primitivism, anti-technologism, neo-Situationist 'cul ... A strong relationship does exist between post-left anarchism and the work of individualist anarchist Max Stirner ...
Social Anarchism Or Lifestyle Anarchism: An Unbridgeable Chasm
... Social Anarchism or Lifestyle Anarchism An Unbridgeable Chasm is a polemical essay written by Murray Bookchin and published as a book in 1995 ... It is a critique of deep ecology, bio-centrism and lifestyle anarchism ... Bookchin sets his social anarchism in opposition to individualist, primitivist and post-modern forms of anarchism (represented, he maintains, by such anarchist ...
Post-left Anarchy - Relationship With Other Tendencies Within Anarchism - Individualist Anarchism
... has identified post-left anarchy as a form of individualist anarchism in Social Anarchism or Lifestyle Anarchism An Unbridgeable Chasm where he says he identifies "a shift ... Indeed, lifestyle anarchism today is finding its principal expression in spray-can graffiti, post-modernist nihilism, antirationalism, neoprimitivism, anti-technologism, neo-Situationist ... relationship does exist with post-left anarchism and the work of individualist anarchist Max Stirner ...

Famous quotes containing the words anarchism and/or lifestyle:

    Anarchism is the only philosophy which brings to man the consciousness of himself; which maintains that God, the State, and society are non-existent, that their promises are null and void, since they can be fulfilled only through man’s subordination. Anarchism is therefore the teacher of the unity of life; not merely in nature, but in man.
    Emma Goldman (1869–1940)

    The hippie is the scion of surplus value. The dropout can only claim sanctity in a society which offers something to be dropped out of—career, ambition, conspicuous consumption. The effects of hippie sanctimony can only be felt in the context of others who plunder his lifestyle for what they find good or profitable, a process known as rip-off by the hippie, who will not see how savagely he has pillaged intricate and demanding civilizations for his own parodic lifestyle.
    Germaine Greer (b. 1939)