LGBT Rights in Wyoming - Recognition of Same-sex Relationships - Legislative History

Legislative History

On February 22, 2007, a bill to prohibit Wyoming from recognizing same-sex marriages from other states was defeated by one vote in a committee of the Wyoming House of Representatives.

In 2009, the House considered an amendment to the state constitution, House Joint Resolution 17, known as the "Defense of Marriage" resolution, defining marriage as a union between a man and a woman. After an intense, emotional debate on the matter, the measure was defeated in a vote by the full House on February 6, with 35 votes against and 25 in favor.

On January 24, 2011, the House passed a bill that would prohibit the state from recognizing same-sex marriages performed outside the state. On February 18, it was passed by the Senate, but after further legislative action it failed. On January 27, 2011, the Senate approved, by two-thirds majority, a constitutional amendment banning same-sex marriage. The proposal died in the House. On January 28, 2011, the House Judiciary Committee voted down a bill legalizing civil unions.

On January 14, 2013, legislators filed two bills. One would establish same-sex marriage in Wyoming by defining marriage as a civil contract between "two natural persons". The other would create domestic partnerships to allow same-sex couples to "obtain the rights, responsibilities, protections and legal benefits provided in Wyoming for immediate family members." Legislators who favor same-sex marriage supported the legislative tactic of offering the two alternatives. On January 28, a House committee defeated the marriage bill 5-4 and approved the domestic partnership bill 7-2, which Governor Matt Mead has said he favors. On January 30, 2013, the House rejected the domestic partnership bill in a 24-35 vote.

Read more about this topic:  LGBT Rights In Wyoming, Recognition of Same-sex Relationships

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