Lebanon - Education

Education

The United Nations assigned Lebanon an education index of 0.871 in 2008. The index, which is determined by the adult literacy rate and the combined primary, secondary, and tertiary gross enrollment ratio, ranked the country 88th out of the 177 countries participating.

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Other articles related to "education":

Outcome-based Education - What Is OBE?
... Outcome-based education is a model of education that rejects the traditional focus on what the school provides to students, in favor of making students demonstrate that ... system has implemented an outcomes-based education systems are Creation of a curriculum framework that outlines specific, measurable outcomes ... A commitment not only to provide an opportunity of education, but to require learning outcomes for advancement ...
Yaroslavl - Education
... Amongst the non-state funded institutions for further education in the city is the International Academy for Business and New Technologies (MUBiNT), and also a number of branches from Moscow-based universities ...
Queens' College, Cambridge - Education At Queens'
... Queens' College accepts students from all academic disciplines, except the combination of Education with English and Drama ... As in all other Cambridge colleges, undergraduate education is based on the tutorial system ...
Fort Wayne, Indiana - Infrastructure - Education - Libraries
... In 1997, Places Rated Almanac recognized Fort Wayne as having the highest reading quotient of any place in North America, due in part to the city's quality library system. ...
Internationalization (Globalization and Education)
... Education is becoming increasingly international ... global rules and norms of how the school should operate and what is education ... contributed to the internationalization of education ...

Famous quotes containing the word education:

    His education lay like a film of white oil on the black lake of his barbarian consciousness. For this reason, the things he said were hardly interesting at all. Only what he was.
    —D.H. (David Herbert)

    If we help an educated man’s daughter to go to Cambridge are we not forcing her to think not about education but about war?—not how she can learn, but how she can fight in order that she might win the same advantages as her brothers?
    Virginia Woolf (1882–1941)

    In the years of the Roman Republic, before the Christian era, Roman education was meant to produce those character traits that would make the ideal family man. Children were taught primarily to be good to their families. To revere gods, one’s parents, and the laws of the state were the primary lessons for Roman boys. Cicero described the goal of their child rearing as “self- control, combined with dutiful affection to parents, and kindliness to kindred.”
    C. John Sommerville (20th century)