Law Enforcement Jargon - Popular Culture

Popular Culture

Law enforcement jargon is heavily used in police procedurals and similar violent shows. CSI: Crime Scene Investigation, a television series about forensic scientists, uses many acronyms such as AFIS, CODIS and DB.

The numeric code 187 from the California Penal Code section dealing with murder has been featured in numerous gangsta rap songs such as Deep Cover and as the title of the movie One Eight Seven.

Read more about this topic:  Law Enforcement Jargon

Other articles related to "culture, popular culture, popular":

Theodor W. Adorno - Theory - Music
... Adorno saw the culture industry as an arena in which critical tendencies or potentialities were eliminated ... He argued that the culture industry, which produced and circulated cultural commodities through the mass media, manipulated the population ... Popular culture was identified as a reason why people become passive the easy pleasures available through consumption of popular culture made people docile and content, no matter how terrible their ...
Eeny, Meeny, Miny, Moe - Popular Culture
... The phrase sometimes appears in other ways, including as a popular song written in 1935 by Johnny Mercer and Matty Malneck ...
Peekskill, New York - Popular Culture
... On the popular 1980s sitcom The Facts of Life, Peekskill was the location of two fictional educational institutions Eastland School for Girls and Langley ...
Moorhead, Minnesota - Arts and Culture - Popular Culture
... Moorhead's pioneer Prairie Home Cemetery on 8th Street is often cited as the inspiration for the name of Garrison Keillor's national radio program, A Prairie Home Companion. ...

Famous quotes containing the words popular culture and/or popular:

    Popular culture is seductive; high culture is imperious.
    Mason Cooley (b. 1927)

    If the Union is now dissolved it does not prove that the experiment of popular government is a failure.... But the experiment of uniting free states and slaveholding states in one nation is, perhaps, a failure.... There probably is an “irrepressible conflict” between freedom and slavery. It may as well be admitted, and our new relations may as be formed with that as an admitted fact.
    Rutherford Birchard Hayes (1822–1893)