Latin Declension

Latin Declension

Latin is an inflected language, and as such has nouns, pronouns, and adjectives that must be declined in order to serve a grammatical function. A set of declined forms of the same word pattern is called a declension. There are five declensions, which are numbered and grouped by ending and grammatical gender. For simple declension paradigms, visit the Wiktionary appendices: First declension, Second declension, Third declension, Fourth declension, Fifth declension.

Read more about Latin Declension:  Grammatical Cases, History of Cases, Pronouns, Adverbs and Their Comparisons and Superlatives

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