Landgrave

Landgrave (Dutch landgraaf, German Landgraf; French landgrave; Latin comes magnus, comes patriae, comes provinciae, comes terrae, comes principalis, lantgravius) was a title used in the Holy Roman Empire and later on by its former territories.

Read more about Landgrave:  Description, Related Terms, Literature, Other Meanings of Landgrave

Other articles related to "landgrave":

Louis IV, Landgrave Of Hesse-Marburg - Ancestors
... Ancestors of Louis IV, Landgrave of Hesse-Marburg 16 ... Louis I, Landgrave of Hesse 8 ... Louis II, Landgrave of Hesse 17 ...
Louis VII, Landgrave Of Hesse-Darmstadt
... Louis VII, Landgrave of Hesse-Darmstadt (22 June 1658 – 31 August 1678) was a Hessian regent ... Louis VII was the son of Landgrave Louis VI of Hesse-Darmstadt and his wife Maria Elisabeth of Holstein-Gottorp ... Following the death of his father, he began to reign as Landgrave on 24 April 1678 ...
Louis I, Landgrave Of Hesse - Ancestry
... Ancestors of Louis I, Landgrave of Hesse 16 ... Henry I, Landgrave of Hesse 8 ... Otto I, Landgrave of Hesse 17 ...
Sophia Eleonore Of Saxony - Children
... She had the following children with George II, Landgrave of Hesse-Darmstadt Louis VI, Landgrave of Hesse-Darmstadt (1630–1678) George, married Dorothea Augusta, Duchess of Holstein-Sonderborg died in ...
Graf - Landgrave
... A Landgraf or Landgrave was a nobleman of comital rank in feudal Germany whose jurisdiction stretched over a sometimes quite considerable territory ... The status of a landgrave was often associated with sovereign rights and decision-making greater than those of a simple Graf (Count), but carried no legal prerogatives ... subsidiary title of such nobility as the Grand Duke of Saxe-Weimar, who functioned as the Landgrave of Thuringia in the first decade of the 20th century but the title fell into disuse after World War I ...