Lake Nakuru

Lake Nakuru is one of the Rift Valley soda lakes at an elevation of 1754 m above sea level. It lies to the south of Nakuru, in the rift valley of Kenya and is protected by Lake Nakuru National Park.

The lake's abundance of algae attracts the vast quantity of flamingos that famously line the shore. Other birds also flourish in the area, as do warthogs, baboons and other large mammals. Black and white rhinos have also been introduced.

The lake's level dropped dramatically in the early 1990s but has since largely recovered.

Nakuru means "Dust or Dusty Place" in the Maasai language. Lake Nakuru National Park, close to Nakuru town, was established in 1961. It started off small, only encompassing the famous lake and the surrounding mountainous vicinity, but has since been extended to include a large part of the savannahs.

Lake Nakuru is protected under the Ramsar Convention on wetlands.

Read more about Lake NakuruLake Nakuru National Park, Habitat and Wildlife

Other articles related to "lake nakuru, nakuru, lake":

Tourism In Kenya - Visitor Attractions - National Parks - Lake Nakuru National Park
... Lake Nakuru National Park (168 kmĀ²), created in 1961 around Lake Nakuru, to the south of Nakuru Town, in the Great Rift Valley ... The surface of the shallow lake is often hardly recognizable due to the continually shifting mass of pink ... The number of flamingoes on the lake varies with water and food conditions and the best vantage point is from Baboon Cliff ...
Lake Nakuru - Habitat and Wildlife
... Lake Nakuru, a small (it varies from 5 to 45 square kilometers) shallow alkaline lake on the southern edge of the town of Nakuru lies about 160 kilometers north of Nairobi ... of a circuit taking in the Masai Mara or Lake Baringo and east to Samburu ... The lake is world famous as the location of the greatest bird spectacle on earth - myriads of fuchsia pink flamingos whose numbers are legion, often more than a million - or even two million ...

Famous quotes containing the word lake:

    What a wilderness walk for a man to take alone! None of your half-mile swamps, none of your mile-wide woods merely, as on the skirts of our towns, without hotels, only a dark mountain or a lake for guide-board and station, over ground much of it impassable in summer!
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