Kilowatt Hour

The kilowatt hour, or kilowatt-hour, (symbol kW·h, kW h or kWh) is a unit of energy equal to 1000 watt hours or 3.6 megajoules. For constant power, energy in watt hours is the product of power in watts and time in hours. The kilowatt hour is most commonly known as a billing unit for energy delivered to consumers by electric utilities.

Read more about Kilowatt HourDefinition, Examples, Symbol and Abbreviation For Kilowatt Hour, Conversions, Watt Hour Multiples and Billing Units, Other Energy-related Units, Confusion of Kilowatt Hours and Kilowatts

Other articles related to "kilowatt, kilowatt hour, hour, kilowatt hours, hours":

Electricity Meter - History - Alternating Current (AC)
... The first specimen of the AC kilowatt-hour meter produced on the basis of Hungarian Ottó Bláthy's patent and named after him was presented by the Ganz Works at the Frankfurt Fair in the autumn ... The AC kilowatt hour meters used at present operate on the same principle as Bláthy's original invention ... Electric company developed a recording watt meter (watt-hour meter) based on an ironless commutator motor ...
Glossary Of Fuel Cell Terms - K - Kilowatt Hour
... The kilowatt hour, also written kilowatt-hour (symbol kW·h, kW h or kWh) is a unit of energy ...
Confusion of Kilowatt Hours and Kilowatts
... A unit of energy is kilowatt hour ... The energy that it generates over a period of time, say one sunny day, would be measured in kilowatt hours ... The energy generated (watt hours) will increase at varying rates while the sun is shining ...
Kwh
... The kilowatt hour, or kilowatt-hour, (symbol kW·h, kW h or kWh) is a unit of energy equal to 1000 watt hours or 3.6 megajoules ... For constant power, energy in watt hours is the product of power in watts and time in hours ... The kilowatt hour is most commonly known as a billing unit for energy delivered to consumers by electric utilities ...

Famous quotes containing the word hour:

    That hour in the life of a man when first the help of humanity fails him, and he learns that in his obscurity and indigence humanity holds him a dog and no man: that hour is a hard one, but not the hardest. There is still another hour which follows, when he learns that in his infinite comparative minuteness and abjectness, the gods do likewise despise him, and own him not of their clan.
    Herman Melville (1819–1891)