Juan Bautista De Anza National Historic Trail

The Juan Bautista de Anza National Historic Trail is a 1,210-mile (1,950 km) National Park Service unit in the United States National Historic Trail and National Millennium Trail programs. The trail route extends from Nogales on the U.S.-Mexico border in Arizona, through the California desert and coastal areas in Southern California and the Central Coast region to San Francisco.

Read more about Juan Bautista De Anza National Historic TrailHistory, Modern Touring

Other articles related to "juan bautista de anza national historic trail, anza, trails, trail, de, national, national historic trail":

Yuma Crossing - Juan Bautista De Anza National Historic Trail
... A Brochure Map for driving and detailed Anza Maps by County, with a Historical destinations-events Guide and the official NPS Juan Bautista de Anza National Historic Trail website are all available for ...
Juan Bautista De Anza National Historic Trail - Modern Touring - Growing
... The Juan Bautista de Anza National Historic Trail "project" is ever growing as local, state, and NPS efforts establish more trails, signage, and interpretive ... The Trail is inspiring activities at existing municipal parks, neighborhood greenbelts, regional parks, and large open space preserves ... can be discovered and tracked at the official Juan Bautista de Anza National Historic Trail website ...
Los Angeles Plaza Historic District - Major Sites - Juan Bautista De Anza National Historic Trail
... The Pueblo de Los Angeles is part of the tour sights of the Juan Bautista de Anza National Historic Trail, a National Park Service unit in the United States National Historic Trail and National ... A Brochure Map for driving and detailed Anza Maps by County, with a Historical destinations-events Guide and the official NPS Juan Bautista de Anza National Historic Trail website are all available ...

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