Josiah Parsons Cooke

Josiah Parsons Cooke (October 12, 1827 – September 3, 1894) was an American scientist who worked at Harvard University and was instrumental in the measurement of atomic weights, inspiring America's first Nobel laureate in chemistry, Theodore Richards, to pursue similar research. Cooke's 1854 paper on atomic weights has been said to foreshadow the periodic law developed later by Mendeleev and others. Historian I. Bernard Cohen described Cooke "as the first university chemist to do truly distinguished work in the field of chemistry" in the United States.

Read more about Josiah Parsons Cooke:  Life and Work, Selected Writings, Activities and Honors

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    Man has an incurable habit of not fulfilling the prophecies of his fellow men.
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