Jodrell Bank Observatory

The Jodrell Bank Observatory (originally the Jodrell Bank Experimental Station, then the Nuffield Radio Astronomy Laboratories from 1966 to 1999; /ˈdʒɒdrəl/) is a British observatory that hosts a number of radio telescopes, and is part of the Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics at the University of Manchester. The observatory was established in 1945 by Sir Bernard Lovell, who wanted to investigate cosmic rays after his work on radar during the Second World War. It has since played an important role in the research of meteors, quasars, pulsars, masers and gravitational lenses, and was heavily involved with the tracking of space probes at the start of the Space Age. The managing director of the observatory is Professor Simon Garrington.

The main telescope at the observatory is the Lovell Telescope, which is the third largest steerable radio telescope in the world. There are three other active telescopes located at the observatory; the Mark II, as well as 42 ft (13 m) and 7 m diameter radio telescopes. Jodrell Bank Observatory is also the base of the Multi-Element Radio Linked Interferometer Network (MERLIN), a National Facility run by the University of Manchester on behalf of the Science and Technology Facilities Council.

The site of the observatory, which includes the Jodrell Bank Visitor Centre and an arboretum, is located in the civil parish of Lower Withington (the rest being in Goostrey civil parish), near Goostrey and Holmes Chapel, Cheshire, North West England. It is reached from the A535. An excellent view of the telescope can be seen by travelling by train, as the main line between Manchester and Crewe passes right by the site, with Goostrey station being only a short distance away.

Read more about Jodrell Bank ObservatoryEarly Years, Searchlight Telescope, Transit Telescope, Lovell Telescope, Mark II and III Telescopes, Mark IV, V and VA Telescopes, Other Single Dishes, MERLIN, Very Long Baseline Interferometry, Square Kilometre Array, Research, Visitor Facilities, and Events, Threat of Closure, Fictional References

Other articles related to "jodrell bank observatory, observatory, jodrell bank":

Jodrell Bank Centre For Astrophysics - Jodrell Bank Observatory
... The Jodrell Bank Observatory, located near Goostrey and Holmes Chapel in Cheshire, has played an important role in the research of meteors, quasars, pulsars, masers and gravitational lenses, and was heavily involved ... The main telescope at the observatory is the Lovell Telescope, which is the third largest steerable radio telescope in the world ... are three other active telescopes located at the observatory the Mark II, as well as 42ft and 7m-diameter radio telescopes ...
Jodrell Bank Observatory - Fictional References
... Jodrell Bank has been mentioned in several popular works of fiction, including Doctor Who (Remembrance of the Daleks, The Poison Sky, The Eleventh Hour and most notably ... Jodrell Bank also featured heavily in the music video to Electric Light Orchestra's 1983 single Secret Messages ... The Observatory is the site of several episodes in the novel Boneland, by Alan Garner (2012), and the central character, Colin Whisterfield, is an astrophysicist on its staff ...
University Of Manchester - Campus - Jodrell Bank Observatory
... The Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics is a combination of the astronomical academic staff, situated in Manchester, and the Jodrell Bank Observatory on rural land near Goostrey, about ten miles (16 ... The observatory has the third largest fully movable radio telescope in the world, the Lovell Telescope, constructed in the 1950s ...

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