Jimmy Van Heusen

Jimmy Van Heusen (January 26, 1913 - February 6, 1990), was an American composer. He wrote songs for films, television and theater, and won an Emmy and four Academy Awards for Best Original Song.

Read more about Jimmy Van Heusen:  Life and Career, Life and Times, Academy Awards, Emmy Award, Other Awards, Trivia

Other articles related to "jimmy van heusen, jimmy":

Sammy Cahn - Music
1957 – "All the Way" (music by Jimmy Van Heusen) introduced by Frank Sinatra in the film The Joker Is Wild. 1959 – "High Hopes" (music by Jimmy Van Heusen) introduced by Frank Sinatra and Eddie Hodges in the film A Hole in the Head. 1963 – "Call Me Irresponsible" (music by Jimmy Van Heusen) introduced by Jackie Gleason in the film Papa's Delicate Condition ...
List Of Songs Introduced By Frank Sinatra
1955 – "The Tender Trap" (music by Jimmy Van Heusen, words by Sammy Cahn) Introduced in the film The Tender Trap, "Love and Marriage" (music by Jimmy Van Heusen, words by Sammy. 1957 – "All the Way" (music by Jimmy Van Heusen, words by Sammy Cahn) introduced in the film The Joker Is Wild. 1959 – "High Hopes" (music by Jimmy Van Heusen, words by Sammy Cahn) introduced with Eddie Hodges in the film A Hole in the Head ...
1947 In Music - Published Popular Music
... Jimmy Kennedy Nat Simon "Apalachicola F.L.A." w ... Jimmy Van Heusen ... Jimmy Kennedy Nat Simon "April in Portugal" w ...
List Of Awards And Nominations Received By Frank Sinatra - Awards, Citations and Honors - Academy Awards
... Last Night" from the motion picture Higher and Higher Composed by Jimmy McHugh with lyrics by Harold Adamson (sung by Frank Sinatra) (1943) Nominated - Academy Award ...

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