Jacobin

Jacobin

The Jacobin Club was the most famous and influential political club in the development of the French Revolution, so-named because of the Dominican convent where they met, which had recently been located in the Rue St. Jacques (Latin: Jacobus), Paris. The club originated as the Club Benthorn, formed at Versailles from a group of Breton representatives attending the Estates General of 1789. There were thousands of chapters throughout France, with a membership estimated at 420,000. After the fall of Robespierre the club was closed.

Initially moderate, the club later became notorious for its implementation of the Reign of Terror. To this day, the terms Jacobin and Jacobinism are used as pejoratives for radical, left-wing revolutionary politics. It should not be confused with Jacobitism.

Read more about Jacobin:  Foundation, Transfer To Paris, Rapid Growth, Initial Moderation, The Terror, Fall From Power

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Jacobin - Influence - Cultural Influence
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Muscadin
... After the coup against Robespierre and the Jacobins of 9 Thermidor Year II, or 27 July 1794, they took on the remaining Jacobins and sans-culottes, and largely ... shaky new government, who had good reason to fear Jacobin mobs, and wider unrest as the hard winter of 1794-5 saw increasing hunger among the Parisian ... White Terror in response to the preceding Reign of Terror of the Jacobins ...
The Poetry of The Anti-Jacobin
... William Gifford compiled the most memorable and innovative parts from the Anti-Jacobin the poems ... The Poetry of the Anti-Jacobin resembles another great work written at the time Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s Poems of Political Recantation ... deal of the poems in the Poetry of the Anti-Jacobin are considered to be humorous, some patriotic poems are written in dull Latin and are therefore conceived to be more serious and tedious ...
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