Italy Women's National Volleyball Team

The Italy women's national volleyball team is the national team of Italy that takes part in international volleyball competitions. It is governed by the Federazione Italiana di Pallavolo (FIPAV). The team's biggest victories were the Gold Medal at the 2002 FIVB Women's World Championship, being the first team to break the domination of Russia, Cuba, China and Japan; the 2007 and the 2011 World Cup, winning 21 out of the 22 matches in both tournaments.

Read more about Italy Women's National Volleyball TeamPalmar├Ęs, Current Squad, 3 Times World Champions, Squads

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