Inns of Chancery

The Inns of Chancery or Hospida Cancellarie were a group of buildings and legal institutions in London initially attached to the Inns of Court and used as offices for the clerks of chancery, from which they drew their name. Existing from at least 1344, the Inns gradually changed their purpose, and became both the offices and accommodation for solicitors (as the Inns of Court were to barristers) and a place of initial training for barristers. The practice of training barristers at the Inns of Chancery had died out by 1642, and the Inns instead became dedicated associations and offices for solicitors. With the founding of the Society of Gentlemen Practisers in 1739 and the Law Society of England and Wales in 1825, a single unified professional association for solicitors, the purpose of the Inns died out, and after a long period of decline the last one (Clement's Inn) was sold in 1903 and demolished in 1934.

Read more about Inns Of Chancery:  History, Inns

Other articles related to "inns of chancery, inn":

Inns Of Chancery - Inns - Gray's Inn Attachments
... Staple Inn dated from at least 1415, and was originally an inn where wool merchants stayed and haggled ... In reference to this, the Inn coat of arms contained a bale of wool ... During the reign of Elizabeth I it was the largest of the Inns of Chancery, with 145 students and 69 as permanent residents ...

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