Innovation System

The concept of the innovation system stresses that the flow of technology and information among people, enterprises and institutions is key to an innovative process. It contains the interaction between the actors who are needed in order to turn an idea into a process, product or service on the market.

Read more about Innovation System:  Development and Diffusion of The Concept

Other articles related to "innovation system, system, innovation":

Development and Diffusion of The Concept - Examples of Definitions of National Innovation Systems
... A national system of innovation has been defined as follows “. ... which provides the framework within which governments form and implement policies to influence the innovation process ... As such it is a system of interconnected institutions to create, store and transfer the knowledge, skills and artefacts which define new technologies.” (Metcalfe, 1995) a human social network that ...
National Innovation System
... The National Innovation System (also NIS, National System of Innovation) is the flow of technology and information among people, enterprises and institutions which is key to the innovative process on the ... According to innovation system theory, innovation and technology development are results of a complex set of relationships among actors in the system, which includes ...

Famous quotes containing the words system and/or innovation:

    An avant-garde man is like an enemy inside a city he is bent on destroying, against which he rebels; for like any system of government, an established form of expression is also a form of oppression. The avant-garde man is the opponent of an existing system.
    Eugène Ionesco (b. 1912)

    Both cultures encourage innovation and experimentation, but are likely to reject the innovator if his innovation is not accepted by audiences. High culture experiments that are rejected by audiences in the creator’s lifetime may, however, become classics in another era, whereas popular culture experiments are forgotten if not immediately successful. Even so, in both cultures innovation is rare, although in high culture it is celebrated and in popular culture it is taken for granted.
    Herbert J. Gans (b. 1927)