Induction Shrink Fitting

Induction shrink fitting refers to the use of induction heater technology to pre-heat metal components between 150 °C (302 °F) and 300 °C (572 °F) thereby causing them to expand and allow for the insertion or removal of another component. Typically the lower temperature range is used on metals such as aluminium and higher temperatures are used on metals such as low/medium carbon steels. The process avoids the changing of mechanical properties whilst allowing components to be worked. Metals typically expand in response to heating and contract on cooling; this dimensional response to temperature change is expressed as a coefficient of thermal expansion.

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