Indian Oil Cup 2005 - Final, Sri Lanka V India 9 August

Final, Sri Lanka V India 9 August

Sri Lanka 281/9 (50 overs) Sri Lanka won by 18 runs

DPMD Jayawardene 83 (97)
A Nehra 6/59

R. Premadasa Stadium, Colombo, Sri Lanka
Umpires: EAR da Silva (SL) and SJA Taufel (Aus)
Man of the Match: DPMD Jayawardene (SL)
Man of the Series: DPMD Jayawardene (SL)

India 263/9 (50 overs)

R Dravid 69 (99)
M Muralitharan 2/35

Sri Lanka prevailed on home soil, recovering from Nehra's spell of swing bowling and Sehwag's massive onslaught to keep their 2.5-year unbeaten record in home international tournaments. It started with Atapattu choosing to bat after winning the toss, and then getting bowled by Nehra for 11 after misreading the line. Sri Lanka sent in a pinch hitter in Dilhara who hit two fours and a single off seven deliveries before being dubiously adjudged lbw, again from Nehra. Nehra took his third wicket when Sangakkara was caught at point by Sehwag, and Sri Lanka were struggling slightly at 67 for 3.

Meanwhile, Jayasuriya was dropped twice, but survived and went on to make 67 before being run out attempting a difficult second run. By that time, however, he had steadied the ship with Jayawardene, and Arnold helped to up the pace - the score being 122 for 4 after 26 overs, when Jayasuriya was out. It did not matter, as Arnold and Jayawardene treated the spinners with disdain, plundering 125 runs in 20 overs and accelerating the scoring to a point where India could not keep up. Nehra tried, and his variations gave him more wickets - he finished with the second six-wicket-haul of his career, the first coming against England in the 2003 World Cup, but a returning Vaas helped himself to 18 not out and upped the total to 281 for 9. An interesting feature of the scorecard was that no Indian bowler apart from Nehra got wickets - six for him, the other three were run outs.

India batted with composure, grit, and the occasional flamboyance - the latter coming from Sehwag especially, who plundered nine fours and a six on his way to a 22-ball 48 before Vaas curved a short one into his body and Sehwag obligingly chopped onto his stumps. It had arguably given India a perfect start, and had included a 22-run over off Dilhara. Ganguly was lbw to Dilshan in the 16th over, but Yuvraj and Dravid set the scene for an Indian victory, pairing up for 84 for the third wicket as India needed 98 in 15 overs. Tricky, but definitely possible in today's ODI cricket.

However, Yuvraj swept to Dilhara when the 36th over began, and just as Kaif had begun to settle in with Dravid, a miscommunication left Dravid out of his crease, run out for 69. Kaif needed to forge a partnership with Dhoni, India's last recognised batsman as they had gone in with five specialist bowlers, but Dhoni was deceived by a straight ball from Chandana and lbw for 7. None of the batsmen from seven to eleven managed to get into double figures, Kaif was left to injudicious hitting and naturally top-edged one to midwicket, and India's chase - thought to be relatively simple fifteen overs before - ended a whole 18 runs short of Sri Lanka's total.

International cricket in 2005
Preceding season: International cricket in 2004–05
April 2005
  • ICC Intercontinental Cup
May 2005
  • West Indies v Pakistan
  • England v Bangladesh
June 2005
  • England v Australia
  • West Indies A in Sri Lanka
July 2005
  • ICC Trophy
  • Sri Lanka v West Indies
  • Bangladesh A in England
  • Sri Lanka U-19s in England
  • Australian Women in Europe
  • Indian Oil Cup
August 2005
  • Afro-Asia Cup
Following season: International cricket in 2005–06
International one day cricket against Sri Lanka
History of cricket in Sri Lanka
Australia
  • 1884
  • 1890–91
  • 1892–93
  • 1895–96
  • 1909–10
  • 1911–12
  • 1913–14
  • 1925–26
  • 1929–30
  • 1933–34
  • 1935–36
  • 1937–38
  • 1945–46
  • 1947–48
  • 1948
  • 1952–53
  • 1960–61
  • 1963–64
  • 1969–70
  • 1980–81
  • 1981
  • 1982–83
  • 1992
  • 1999
  • 2003–04
  • 2007–08
  • 2011
  • 2011–12
Bangladesh
  • 1986
  • 1988
  • 1990
  • 1990–91
  • 1995
  • 1997
  • 2000
  • 2002
  • 2003
  • 2004
  • 2005–06
  • 2005–06
  • 2006
  • 2006-07
  • 2007
  • 2008
  • 2008–09
  • 2009–10
  • 2010
Bermuda
  • 2006-07
Canada
  • 2003
England
  • 1981–82
  • 1983
  • 1987
  • 1988
  • 1989/90
  • 1992
  • 1992–93
  • 1996
  • 1998
  • 1998–99
  • 1999
  • 2000–01
  • 2002
  • 2002–03
  • 2003–04
  • 2004
  • 2006
  • 2006-07
  • 2007–08
  • 2009
  • 2011
India
  • 1944–45
  • 1956–57
  • 1973–74
  • 1985
  • 1993
  • 1997
  • 1998–99
  • 2001
  • 2005
  • 2006
  • 2007–08
  • 2008
  • 2008–09
  • 2009–10
  • 2010
  • 2011–12
  • 2012
Ireland
  • 2006-07
Kenya
  • 1996
  • 1999
  • 2003
  • 2003
Netherlands
  • 2002
  • 2006
United Arab Emirates
  • 2004
  • 2008
West Indies
  • 1975
  • 1984-85
  • 1984-85
  • 1986-87
  • 1987
  • 1989-90
  • 1992
  • 1993-94
  • 1993-94
  • 1993–94
  • 1995-96
  • 1995-96
  • 1995–96
  • 1996–97
  • 1997-98
  • 1999-00
  • 2000-01
  • 2001-02
  • 2003
  • 2003
  • 2005
  • 2006-07
  • 2006-07
  • 2007-08
Zimbabwe
  • 1992
  • 1992-93
  • 1993-94
  • 1994–95
  • 1996
  • 1996
  • 1996-97
  • 1997–98
  • 1998-99
  • 1999
  • 1999–2000
  • 2000-01
  • 2001-02
  • 2001-02
  • 2003
  • 2003
  • 2004
  • 2004
  • 2004-05
  • 2006-07
  • 2008–09
  • 2008-09
  • 2010
at home-neutral-away
International Test cricket tours of Sri Lanka
Sri Lankan International Test cricket tours abroad · Other tours of Sri Lanka
2005 and 2005-06 Sri Lankan cricket seasons
  • Inter-Provincial
  • Premier Championship
  • Premier Limited Overs
  • Twenty20
  • West Indies A in SL
  • West Indies in SL
  • India in SL
  • Indian Oil Cup
  • Bangladesh in SL
  • SL in India
  • SL in Australia
  • Pakistan in SL
  • Tests
  • ODIs

Read more about this topic:  Indian Oil Cup 2005

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