Indian Ocean Games

Indian Ocean Games

The Indian Ocean Island Games (French: Jeux des îles de l'océan Indien) is a multi-sport event held every four years among athletes from Indian Ocean islands. The Games was adopted by the International Olympic Committee (IOC) in 1976 and currently gather the islands of Mauritius, Seychelles, Comoros, Madagascar, Mayotte, Réunion and the Maldives. The number of athletes who participate has increased over tthe years, it went from 1000 athletes in 1979 to over 1500 participants in 2003 and 2007.

Read more about Indian Ocean GamesOrigins, Participating Countries, Different Competitions

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